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© 2018 Dv Camera Hire Ltd

10-11 Percy Street, London W1T 1DN

0207 430 1811

We accept most credit cards and debit card - but no AMEX!

VINTAGE

VHS + Mini DV

CAMERA HIRE

London Camera Hire

HIRE VINTAGE VHS CAMCORDERS - VIDEO 8MM CAMERAS

VHS-C CAMERA - MINI DV - WORKING AND NON-WORKING CAMERAS TO RENT

We hire working VHS video camcorders or non-working VHS cameras for props. 

We stock an umber of old video cameras to hire. Some are workings so will give you that 70,80,90's feel and some do not work allowing you to use them as props!

We have many old VHS camcorders and video cameras to hire.  We have the 1980's old VHS shoulder cameras to rent - working and non-working cameras are available to hire.  We have the 'newer' VHS camcorder which holder the small VHS cassettes - VHSc.  A range of old video camcorders to hire - VHS vintage cameras, VHSc cameras, Video 8mm and Mini DV old vintage cameras for hire. 

We hire working Mini DV camcorders

We SELL tape stock and offer a TAPE > FILE transfer service

We hold many types of old video cameras to hire - 70,80,90's camcorders all available to rent. We have working cameras for that old 1980's VHS look and cameras that do not work, but just look the part! We supply films with old stills cameras, old video cameras and monitors for props. Whether you need x30 SLR cameras dating back to the 1970's or an old ENG video camera from the 1980's we may have one in stock - so please do email us and let us know your requirement for your next film or production. 

We hire old VHS camcorders, Video 8mm cameras, Mini DV cameras, VHS c Camcorders

Hire old cameras for props. Film and TV camera prop hire.

What made video tape recorders unique were their ability to record and play back moving images and sound.  They were recorded sound the same way as an audio-tape recorder, but did it in such a way that allowed for the majority of the width of the tape to be available for the video track.  The 1970s was the period when major steps and improvement were made to video tape recorders, resulting in the eventual creating of the Video Home System standard.  However, during this time several other companies also made attempts to produce a television recording device, hoping the majority of the world would embrace their product.

For the videocassette recorders (VCRs) to become a popular appliance, it needed to be affordable for people to buy and easy for them to operate.  As a result two Japanese companies, Sony and JVC (Japanese Victor Company) developed rival VCR formats in the early 1970s, which would later evolved into the VHS/Betamax Format Wars.  The first VCR to use VHS standard was the Victor HR-3300, and was introduced by the president of JVC on September 9, 1976.  The United States did not receive its first VHS-based VCR, the RCA VBT200, until August 23, 1977.  Despite VHS and Betamax being the major companies in the VCR market, other competitors still existed.

As early as 1963, Philips and a number of smaller companies began to develop videocassette formats.  In 1969, Sony announced the first videocassette format.  Its ¾ inch U-Matic cassette and recorders were commercially introduced in 1971.  U-Matic was successful in attracting smaller educational and business users, but not the general public.  Its formatting allowed only for playback of a recording only to be possible through a special monitor, rather than a television.  Throughout the 1970s VHS and Sony battled each other for dominance in the video recording market.[2]

By the mid 1980s VHS had achieved a supreme dominance in the home VCR market.  Philips abandoned its latest VCR model, the Video 2000, in 1985 and Sony folded to consumer demand by producing VHS VCRs until 1988.  As a result from is victory of Betamax, the Video Home System (VHS) dominated the theater of video recording and video watching. 

Wikipedia 

The Video Home System (VHS) is a standard for consumer-level analogue video recording on tape cassettes. Developed by Victor Company of Japan (JVC) in the early 1970s, it was released in Japan in late 1976 and in the United States in early 1977.

From the 1950s, magnetic tape video recording became a major contributor to the television industry, via the first commercialised video tape recorders (VTRs). At that time, the devices were used only in expensive professional environments such as television studios and medical imaging (fluoroscopy). In the 1970s, videotape entered home use, creating the home video industry and changing the economics of the television and movie businesses. The television industry viewed videocassette recorders (VCRs) as having the power to disrupt their business, while television users viewed the VCR as the means to take control of their hobby.

In the 1970s and early 1980s, there was a format war in the home video industry. Two of the standards, VHS and Betamax, received the most media exposure. VHS eventually won the war, dominating 60 percent of the North American market by 1980 and emerging as the dominant home video format throughout the tape media period.

Optical disc formats later began to offer better quality than analogue consumer video tape such as standard and super-VHS. The earliest of these formats, LaserDisc, was not widely adopted. However, after the introduction of the DVD format in 1997, VHS's market share began to decline. By 2008, DVD had replaced VHS as the preferred low-end method of distribution. The last known company in the world to manufacture VHS equipment—Funai of Japan—ceased production of VHS equipment in July 2016.

Sony Handycam
Samsung Handycam
Sony PC21 Camcorder

We hire working VHS video camcorders or non-working VHS cameras for props. 

We stock an umber of old video cameras to hire. Some are workings so will give you that 70,80,90's feel and some do not work allowing you to use them as props!

We have many old VHS camcorders and video cameras to hire.  We have the 1980's old VHS shoulder cameras to rent - working and non-working cameras are available to hire.  We have the 'newer' VHS camcorder which holder the small VHS cassettes - VHSc.  A range of old video camcorders to hire - VHS vintage cameras, VHSc cameras, Video 8mm and Mini DV old vintage cameras for hire. 

We hire working Mini DV camcorders

Sony Handycam
Samsung Handycam
Sony Mini DV PC21 Camcorder
Sony Mini DV 33E Camcorder
Sony Mini DV PD150 
Sony HDV FX1 

We SELL tape stock and offer a TAPE > FILE transfer service

We hold many types of old video cameras to hire - 70,80,90's camcorders all available to rent. We have working cameras for that old 1980's VHS look and cameras that do not work, but just look the part! We supply films with old stills cameras, old video cameras and monitors for props. Whether you need x30 SLR cameras dating back to the 1970's or an old ENG video camera from the 1980's we may have one in stock - so please do email us and let us know your requirement for your next film or production. 

We hire old VHS camcorders, Video 8mm cameras, Mini DV cameras, VHS c Camcorders

Hire old cameras for props. Film and TV camera prop hire.

What made video tape recorders unique were their ability to record and play back moving images and sound.  They were recorded sound the same way as an audio-tape recorder, but did it in such a way that allowed for the majority of the width of the tape to be available for the video track.  The 1970s was the period when major steps and improvement were made to video tape recorders, resulting in the eventual creating of the Video Home System standard.  However, during this time several other companies also made attempts to produce a television recording device, hoping the majority of the world would embrace their product.

For the videocassette recorders (VCRs) to become a popular appliance, it needed to be affordable for people to buy and easy for them to operate.  As a result two Japanese companies, Sony and JVC (Japanese Victor Company) developed rival VCR formats in the early 1970s, which would later evolved into the VHS/Betamax Format Wars.  The first VCR to use VHS standard was the Victor HR-3300, and was introduced by the president of JVC on September 9, 1976.  The United States did not receive its first VHS-based VCR, the RCA VBT200, until August 23, 1977.  Despite VHS and Betamax being the major companies in the VCR market, other competitors still existed.

As early as 1963, Philips and a number of smaller companies began to develop videocassette formats.  In 1969, Sony announced the first videocassette format.  Its ¾ inch U-Matic cassette and recorders were commercially introduced in 1971.  U-Matic was successful in attracting smaller educational and business users, but not the general public.  Its formatting allowed only for playback of a recording only to be possible through a special monitor, rather than a television.  Throughout the 1970s VHS and Sony battled each other for dominance in the video recording market.[2]

By the mid 1980s VHS had achieved a supreme dominance in the home VCR market.  Philips abandoned its latest VCR model, the Video 2000, in 1985 and Sony folded to consumer demand by producing VHS VCRs until 1988.  As a result from is victory of Betamax, the Video Home System (VHS) dominated the theater of video recording and video watching. 

Wikipedia 

The Video Home System (VHS) is a standard for consumer-level analogue video recording on tape cassettes. Developed by Victor Company of Japan (JVC) in the early 1970s, it was released in Japan in late 1976 and in the United States in early 1977.

From the 1950s, magnetic tape video recording became a major contributor to the television industry, via the first commercialised video tape recorders (VTRs). At that time, the devices were used only in expensive professional environments such as television studios and medical imaging (fluoroscopy). In the 1970s, videotape entered home use, creating the home video industry and changing the economics of the television and movie businesses. The television industry viewed videocassette recorders (VCRs) as having the power to disrupt their business, while television users viewed the VCR as the means to take control of their hobby.

In the 1970s and early 1980s, there was a format war in the home video industry. Two of the standards, VHS and Betamax, received the most media exposure. VHS eventually won the war, dominating 60 percent of the North American market by 1980 and emerging as the dominant home video format throughout the tape media period.

Optical disc formats later began to offer better quality than analogue consumer video tape such as standard and super-VHS. The earliest of these formats, LaserDisc, was not widely adopted. However, after the introduction of the DVD format in 1997, VHS's market share began to decline. By 2008, DVD had replaced VHS as the preferred low-end method of distribution. The last known company in the world to manufacture VHS equipment—Funai of Japan—ceased production of VHS equipment in July 2016.

We hire working Hi8mm camcorders